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    • #13807
       solidgold
      Member

      Hey y’all,

      So the backstory is a friend of mine gave me all of his equipment – everything from machines to needles to grommets. Everything. He taught me what he knew, gave me a pat on the back and moved to FL. Now I’m studying with a guy in my town who’s opening up his own shop, but before this, I did about 5 tatts on my own based on the knowledge my friend gave me, in my own home.

      …so, I used one machine, fitted with one tube (non-disposable) and one needle (sterile of course) on this fellow who, i recently found out, has HPV (human pappiloma-virus).

      Now, my practice is to put any used machine after the appointment into a plastic sandwich baggie and put it aside to be cleaned. I did so with this particular machine and then did not get to cleaning it for a couple weeks due to extenuating circumstances (somebody died).

      But i proceeded with cleaning the rest of my equipment as normal, and didn’t touch any of my other machines. The one that i used on this guy is still in the baggie on my windowsill. Whats the deal? Should I just trash this machine at this point?…. as it stands right now, I do NOT have an autoclave but am working on getting one. Will this take care of it? What about cross-contamination? Even though I’m a home operation right now I try to be very, very, very diligent about cleanliness but this is the first time I’ve really realized how serious all of this bloodborne stuff can be. Should I be concerned for my grommets, rubberbands, etc? Other machines? You know you try to be careful but all it takes is a few too many microbes and right kind of conditions to infect somebody. What do you guys think??

      Thanks.

    • #16781
       BigDaddyGA
      Member

      Take a bloodborne pathogen class, $45, and sanitize everything after every client. You can’t autclave your machine, get a jug of Madicide and follow the directions. Then RUSH out and get an apprenticeship before you hurt someone or yourself.

    • #16782
       LauraP
      Member

      A clean machine is important for the health of your clients so learn how to clean it after use. Assemble a sanitary wipe, a proper cleaner or a mild bleach and warm water mixture. You can use any of these products to clean off ink spatter and buildup.Wash off the rubber grommets on the nipple where the needle bar attaches to the armature. People often forget to wash them after every tattoo because there was removable tape on older model tattoo guns instead of grommets.Wipe the whole machine down including the coils, yoke, tube, springs, armature and top and bottom posts. Rinse with lukewarm water and dry carefully with a soft cloth.

    • #16783
       xDreamerx
      Participant

      Big said it right. %100 agreed. Go get an apprenticeship, give your machine a chemical bath….etc.

      Well said BIG.

    • #16784

      First of all:
      “The American Social Health Association reported estimates that about 75-80% of sexually active Americans will be infected with HPV at some point in their lifetime”
      Just google “HPV”

      Second of all:
      Why would you put your machine in a baggie after a client?

      Third of all:
      I think it is safe to say you don’t work in a tattoo studio!
      : )

      Fourth of all: (okay I am going to stop with the “of all”…
      The goal is to put your machine in a baggie “BEFORE” the tattoo starts –
      ahhh. light bulbs – right? The baggie is a CONDOM for your tattoo machine.

      harsh chemicals will eat the hell out of the plastic on your machine.
      Hence the barrier protection.

      Pick up a copy of Basic Fundamentals of Modern Tattoo – Read the Helth Chapters a few times – you will get it.

      Get into a real shop and get an apprenticeship.
      ONLY use disposible tubes.
      You will hear pros in shops say “metal tubes are okay”
      But newbies hear this and immediatly stop listenign after that line…
      If YOU HAVE BEEN TATTOOING LESS THAN 5 years – you MUST use disposible tubes!

      Get it?
      Disposible tubes are cheap as hell now. No excuses.
      Throw your rubber grommets out – use a paper towl instead on the armature bar nipple –
      Throw it all away.
      Clean hand – dirty hand
      Hot zone cold zone –

      Don’t put anything in a “baggie” fir safe keeping – that is (sorry) retarded.
      Don’t tattoo at your house – unless it is on practice skin or on yourself.
      Even then: wear gloves and use disposible stuff.

      Always put plastic down before you start tattooing or put metal foil down.
      Barrier protection for all your surfaces.

      You do not have an autoclave – you can not use metal – anything!

      Best of luck!
      Don’t give tattoo a bad name. get an apprenticeship

    • #16785

      Is the issue with rubber grommets that it would be possible to contaminate a whole bag of them getting something out, where paper towel is totally single-use?

    • #16786

      I think paper towel is more snug!
      But also a lot of people will pull the needle off the machine – and inadvertently touch the gromett

    • #16787

      I got a different batch of rubber grommets the other day, and they are way too small for the inside of the needle’s loop, so I used a bit of paper to tighten up the fit. I might move over to just using the paper all the time once I’ve used these grommets, as no point in spending money on something when a nearly free alternative works just as well :D

    • #16788

      Some A-bars on tattoo machines are bit larger on the nipple than others. Using paper – all you have to do is rip a small piece of paper towel and fold it – usually 2 folds works – but sometimes I will use 3 or 4 folds.
      Either way, Once I used paper towel – I really liked the snugness – seems to have less movement in the needle as I am tattooing… just personal opinion though…
      I also used ot hate trying to get those full grommets in there!

      The 1/2 grommets seem to have too much play in them –
      but it depends on the your style / and tattoo machine pref.

    • #16789
       xDreamerx
      Participant

      …..also to add on the grommets topic. I use mechanic paper towel (kind) for my needle bar. I used to use the regular white paper towels, I dont rip when I use the blue mechanic paper towels. Both will work, but just an idea. And yes the 2-3 fold works perfect for me. Just my 2 cents……and yes I want my change he he he

    • #16790

      @canvasyou wrote:

      Some A-bars on tattoo machines are bit larger on the nipple than others. Using paper – all you have to do is rip a small piece of paper towel and fold it – usually 2 folds works – but sometimes I will use 3 or 4 folds.
      Either way, Once I used paper towel – I really liked the snugness – seems to have less movement in the needle as I am tattooing… just personal opinion though…
      I also used ot hate trying to get those full grommets in there!

      The 1/2 grommets seem to have too much play in them –
      but it depends on the your style / and tattoo machine pref.

      Yeah, I’ve noticed that and it’s much easier using paper :) The type of grommet I first used, I think are called ‘hybrid grommets’, and kind of donut shaped, where the rubber grommets I got the other day (and don’t like) are literally just a rubber sleeve which goes over the nipple, but leaves play on the needle loop, so paper all the way from now on :)

      @xDreamerx wrote:

      …..also to add on the grommets topic. I use mechanic paper towel (kind) for my needle bar. I used to use the regular white paper towels, I dont rip when I use the blue mechanic paper towels. Both will work, but just an idea. And yes the 2-3 fold works perfect for me. Just my 2 cents……and yes I want my change he he he

      Do you mean the ‘industrial blue’ stuff which is in garages?

    • #16791
       flytattoo
      Member

      Ok….

      I contacted the health deparment here in Iceland and i told them what i do after i tatt….

      1st throw all away that i can trow away by the way i use metal tips and grips…
      I take all apart and tips and grip i clean with green soap and scrub it then i put it in pot and boil it for like hour…
      Then i take the gun and whipe it all down with disinfecting tissues.. and ALL the time i wear gloves….
      Then i lay all down on paper towel dry it down and go over it with disinfecting towel again.

      They told me this would be good and safe but they recommended Autoclave :)

    • #16792

      @flytattoo wrote:

      Ok….

      I contacted the health deparment here in Iceland and i told them what i do after i tatt….

      1st throw all away that i can trow away by the way i use metal tips and grips…
      I take all apart and tips and grip i clean with green soap and scrub it then i put it in pot and boil it for like hour…
      Then i take the gun and whipe it all down with disinfecting tissues.. and ALL the time i wear gloves….
      Then i lay all down on paper towel dry it down and go over it with disinfecting towel again.

      They told me this would be good and safe but they recommended Autoclave :)

      THE ONLY way to use metal is to use autoclave.
      The health dept in iceland does not have same standards as USA.

      Please use disposable tubes – its just easier and safer for everyone!

    • #16793
       Candice
      Member

      @LauraP wrote:

      A clean machine is important for the health of your clients so learn how to clean it after use. Assemble a sanitary wipe, a proper cleaner or a mild bleach and warm water mixture. You can use any of these products to clean off ink spatter and buildup.Wash off the rubber grommets on the nipple where the needle bar attaches to the armature. People often forget to wash them after every tattoo because there was removable tape on older model tattoo guns instead of grommets.Wipe the whole tattoo machine supplies down including the coils, yoke, tube, springs, armature and top and bottom posts. Rinse with lukewarm water and dry carefully with a soft cloth.

      I agree with you, to do all the health, for the health of others.

    • #16794

      First off clean you machine something, bleach, anything for the medical section on a tattoo site. Glove up don’t poke yourself.
      Second an autoclave is just a pressure cooker. 215 degrees-f, at 15 psi, for 15 minutes. Grab some pouches from element for a few bucks.
      Barriers are as simple as packing tape, have some “on your feet” thinking!

      No Apprenticeship,
      -Henry

    • #16795

      @canvasyou wrote:

      THE ONLY way to use metal is to use autoclave.
      The health dept in iceland does not have same standards as USA.

      Please use disposable tubes – its just easier and safer for everyone!

      AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA :lol: :lol:

      In the past fortnight, I’ve been in two different UK studios, neither of which, had artists bagging clip cords or machines. From watching episodes of LA/Miami/NY Ink, I rarely saw bags being used, although I remember seeing clip covers being used in Inked. I remember reading online about someone who was cleaning up after a tattoo convention complaining that they weren’t issued gloves (which I thought was a bit disgusting that they hadn’t been) who was simply told “This isn’t California…” so I do wonder if some of the American standards are, shall we say, unnecessarily cautious? All these statistics on diseases etc, are pretty scary, and do point to the need to maintain scrupulous hygiene, but they also make a disturbing statement about the health of the nation… For the record, I use at least one pair of gloves while setting up my work station (maybe changing 2/3 times) then another pair of gloves while setting up my machine(s) (changing if necessary) then yet another pair of gloves to prepare the client and the stencil, and that’s before I even start tattooing… I bag clip cords and machine, use rubber barriers on the power pack’s adjustment, and ensure that any lights are turned on and positioned while setting up, so there is no need for me to adjust them while working. I use tin foil as a base for the equipment to go on. I use bio-hazard bags for the dirty tissues, and use a medical sharps bin for used needles. I use single use wooden tongue depressors for laying down petroleum jelly, and only ever use single use needles/ink caps/grips etc. I also use folded tissue on the armature bar instead of grommets. Everything gets sprayed with antiseptic during set up and while breaking down. I dare anyone to criticize my practices…

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